Wednesday, January 05, 2011

My top 10 influential thinkers in cloud ...

I've never been a great fan of top ten lists, however since it appears fashionable I thought I'd have a go. So, here are my top 10 most influential thinkers to the cloud in order of priority:

  1. Douglas Parkhill: For predicting the entire field and writing the exceptional book "The Challenge of the Computer Utility" (1966)
  2. Joseph Schumpeter: For providing a basic economic framework which explains why cloud computing should enable further innovation through creative destruction (1942)
  3. Herbert Simon: For providing a basic economic framework which explains why cloud computing should accelerate further innovation through componentisation (1973)
  4. William Stanley Jevons: For outlining why cloud computing won't reduce overall IT expenditure (1865)
  5. Leigh Van Valen: For providing in "a new evolutionary law" a framework to explain why you wouldn't have choice over cloud computing (1973)
  6. Tim O'Reilly: For signposting the cloud computing future with the concept of infoware and highlighting the role of the internet and open source in this (1999)
  7. Everett Rogers: For postulating that diffusion and maturation of a technological innovation results in increased information about the technology and therefore reduces uncertainty about the change. A key cornerstone of the idea of commoditisation (1981)
  8. Paul Strassmann: For demonstrating that there was no correlation between IT spending and business value, hence showing that not all IT is the same and that some was little more than a cost of doing business i.e. it had become more of a commodity (1990s)
  9. Nick Carr: For showing that ubiquity was the key to diminishing strategic value in business and providing the crucial link to explain commoditisation (2003)
  10. John McCarthy: For being the first person to publicly state the idea of utility computing (1961)

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Nice, when are bellbottoms coming back into fashion?

Dave Michels said...

You Forgot Jonas Hanway

The word "umbrella" comes from the Latin root word "umbra", meaning shade or shadow. Starting in the 16th century the umbrella became popular to the western world, especially in the rainy weather of northern Europe. At first it was considered only an accessory suitable for women. Then the Persian traveler and writer, Jonas Hanway (1712-86), carried and used an umbrella publicly in England for thirty years, he popularized umbrella use among men. English gentleman often referred to their umbrellas as a "Hanway."

swardley said...

Thank you, much appreciated. Now I must go and solder my iphone to one :-)

Jake Coventry said...

Nice article. Top quality list.

TuxSax said...

[quote]
William Stanley Jevons: For outlining why cloud computing won't reduce overall IT expenditure (1865)
[/quote]

Say what? cloud computing? IT? it's freaking 1865!!!

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